About Us

With the purchase of the Ordeman House in 1967, the Landmarks Foundation and City of Montgomery cemented a unique partnership that has resulted in the restoration and interpretation of over 50 authentically restored 19th and early 20th century structures stretching along six blocks in downtown historic Montgomery.

Since opening to the public in 1971, the Ordeman House has become the nucleus around which Landmarks’ Old Alabama Town has grown. Through this historic village, guests are able to view authentically restored and furnished buildings reflecting the lives of the people who built Central Alabama. Our historic properties include:

  • Molton House Circa 1850s, acquired in 1993
  • Dogtrot circa 1850s, acquired in 1979
  • Cram-Lakin House Circa 1850s, acquired in 1980s
  • Graves-Haigler House Circa 1841, acquired in 1980s
  • Martin-Barnes House Circa 1834, acquired in 1981
  • Ware-Farley-Hood House ca. 1850s, acquired in 1989
  • Church Circa 1888, acquired in 1977
  • Thompson Mansion Circa 1850s, acquired in 1988
  • Lucas Tavern Circa 1810s, acquired in 1980
  • Adams Chapel School Circa 1895, acquired in 1982
  • Ordeman-Mitchell-Shaw House Circa 1850s, acquired in 1968
  • Corner Grocery Store Circa 1892, acquired in 1983

For a complete list of Old Alabama Town properties, as well as their individual histories, please refer to Mary Ann Neeley’s “Old Alabama Town: An Illustrated Guide,” available for purchase in the Old Alabama Town giftshop.

Mission

The mission of the Landmarks Foundation and Old Alabama Town is to preserve, interpret and present Central Alabama’s architecture, history and culture. This is accomplished by:

  • Identifying historic at-risk properties in need of preservation
  • Joining with other community groups to campaign for the preservation of at-risk historic properties
  • Overseeing the restoration of identified preservation projects
  • Authentically restoring structures to their original style and purpose
  • Operating the outdoor history museum, Old Alabama Town, which presents 19th century living to more than 60,000 visitors annually
  • Hosting special events highlighting Alabama’s history and culture